Men's Suiting

It’s common knowledge that fashion is cyclical, so it should come as little surprise that the reign of skinny silhouettes would come to an end eventually.

Just look at the recent evolution of neckties. The Beatles are widely recognised as the pioneers of the modern skinny tie. The Fab Four sent the fat neckties of the 1940s and ’50s packing when they touched down in New York City in 1964 sporting thin black ties.

The skinny tie trend slowly faded away as the fashion world changed, and by the 1980s, wider ties like those worn by Michael Douglas’s character Gordon Gekko in Wall Street emerged as the style du jour. The 4-inches-plus neckties that were a staple of the 1980s and ’90s menswear were the antithesis of the modern man’s style.

It came back at the end of the previous decade, and now it’s looking to be partying again.

In a footnote on page 86 of its latest catalogue, the trendsetting chain quietly announced, “We widened our ties by ¼” to keep up with today’s changing proportions,” J.Crew said.

An entire culture of fashion-savvy males — have been sporting since at least 2011, according to Newser. But take heed: That doesn’t necessarily mean the pendulum is swinging in the other direction entirely, either.

The announcement means that J. Crew will be bumping up its tie widths from 2.5 to 2.75 inches — still slimmer than the typical mainstream tie, which measures between 3 and 3.25 inches.

This is not to say that hipsters — or even trend-loving teachers, attorneys, or bankers have to say goodbye to their skinny-tie aesthetic. After all, personal style is just that: personal. As Christian suggests, if skinny fashion is your thing, by all means, keep the skinny necktie in your arsenal, and tie it on it proudly.  But if you’re somewhere in between and not deeply affected by shifts in fashion trends, you’re in the best possible place. You’re like Cary Grant: in the middle of fashion. And that’s a great place to be, Christian suggests. If you stay somewhere near the centre of the fashion continuum, “You’ll never be out of style”.